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CRC's partners since 2015.
CRC’s partners since 2015.

 

As the Coastal Resilience Center (CRC) continues its sixth year of projects focusing on protecting communities from coastal hazards, the Center has added new work while completing some projects from Years 1-5. As an addition to previous years’ project work, partners are working to transition their research or education programs beyond the life of the CRC. The Center has added two new projects while completing two others as of July 1, 2020.

CRC, based at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH), currently supports 16 core projects, 11 research and 5 education, as part of its FY2020-21 work.

CRC’s projects are divided into four categories: Coastal Infrastructure Resilience, Building Resilient Communities, Coastal Hazards Modeling and Education & Workforce Development. In the coming year, researchers and educators will focus on the most effective ways to transition research outcomes, tools and guidance to end-users on the federal, state and local levels.

The first new project is led by Dr. Austin Becker of the University of Rhode Island, who was previously a researcher on a project led by Dr. Isaac Ginis. Dr. Clint Dawson of the University of Texas-Austin and Dr. Casey Dietrich of North Carolina State University are now working on a second project with Dr. Don Resio of the University of North Florida, in addition to continuing their existing project from previous years.

CRC researchers from Oregon State University, along with OSU students and University of Puerto Rico-Mayagüez students taking part in the SUMREX exchange program, test the strength of a model structure in the OH Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory in the summer of 2018.
CRC researchers from Oregon State University, along with OSU students and University of Puerto Rico-Mayagüez students taking part in the SUMREX exchange program, test the strength of a model structure in the OH Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory in the summer of 2018. Photo submitted.

Coastal Infrastructure Resilience

Dr. Dan Cox of Oregon State University and Dr. John van de Lindt of Colorado State University lead the CRC’s Coastal Infrastructure Resilience project, “Experimental and Numerical Study to Improve Damage and Loss Estimation Due to Overland Wave and Surge Hazards on Near-Coast Structures: Integration and Validation of Residential Wave/Surge Fragilities for HAZUS-MH and Hindcast Study for Damage and Loss Uncertainty.” The project will continue to focus on improving coastal damage and loss estimation by advancing the fragility calculations used in the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s HAZUS-MH model.

 

Building Resilient Communities

Dr. Phil Berke of UNC-Chapel Hill and Jaimie Masterson of Texas A&M University led the project “Application of Plan Integration for Resilience Scorecard™ at the National Scale in Partnership with the American Planning Association.” The researchers will work with the American Planning Association (APA) to integrate the Scorecard into APA outreach and planning tools for its national audience of planning professionals, as well as with other municipal officials involved in long-range planning.

Dr. James Prochaska of URI leads the project “Increasing Personal Preparedness through Computer Tailored Interventions,” which will advance work on applying a behavior change model to assess individuals’ disaster preparedness actions by continuing a population trial of their tailored transtheoretical model.

Dr. Austin Becker, who has worked on several University of Rhode Island-based projects in Years 1-5, leads a new project, “Hazard Consequence Threshold Models for Emergency Management and Response Decision Making.” This work will tie into a modeling project led by Dr. Isaac Ginis, also of URI, by utilizing a hazard consequence modeling system to illustrate the impact of potential hurricanes on coastal infrastructure.

Dr. Robert Twilley of LSU leads the project “Integrating CERA-Planning Software to develop Hazus Modeling and Planning Tool for ADCIRC Prediction System™,” in which he will use the CERA-Planning tool to improve community planning through flood exposure and damage modeling techniques.

 

A simulation of storm surge on the North Carolina coast is generated by the ADCIRC model, part of the ADCIRC Prediction System™. Image submitted by Jason Fleming.
A simulation of storm surge on the North Carolina coast is generated by the ADCIRC model, part of the ADCIRC Prediction System™. Image submitted by Jason Fleming.

Coastal Hazards Modeling

All projects in this category focus on improving the capabilities of the ADCIRC Prediction System, adding inputs, improving speed and creating a business model for sustained operations. This work is led by Center Lead Investigator Dr. Rick Luettich, founder of APS™.

The modeling project “Development of an Optimized Tide and Hurricane Storm Surge Model for the West Coast of FL for Use Within the ADCIRC Surge Guidance System,” which was led by Dr. Scott Hagen of Louisiana State University (LSU) with co-PIs Dr. Stephen Medeiros of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and Dr. Matthew Bilskie (now of the University of Georgia), have released a final report on their work. See a presentation from earlier this year on the results of their work.

 

Education and Workforce Development

Prof. Ismael Pagán-Trinidad of the University of Puerto Rico-Mayagüez leads a site visit with a class as part of a three-day event conducted with federal partners in 2019. Photo submitted.
Prof. Ismael Pagán-Trinidad of the University of Puerto Rico-Mayagüez leads a site visit with a class as part of a three-day event conducted with federal partners in 2019. Photo submitted.

Five active education projects will continue building degree programs intended to diversify the homeland security workforce. They are:

To read more about these projects and researchers, visit the CRC Investigators page. To see a map of where they work, visit https://unc.live/2AYo0Nm.

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